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  1. Data Management
  2. DM-9169

Provide high-stellar-density fields for deblender testing

    Details

    • Type: Story
    • Status: Done
    • Resolution: Done
    • Fix Version/s: None
    • Component/s: None
    • Labels:
      None
    • Story Points:
      4
    • Sprint:
      DRP S17-3, DRP S17-4
    • Team:
      Data Release Production

      Description

      Provide high stellar density fields for deblender testing.

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          rearmstr Bob Armstrong added a comment -

          I have chosen data we already had of M31 on hand to use for this. We only had two broadbands (g and r) and one narrow band. I only processed the broadbands, so there is not much color information. We can revisit this again if this is important and select a different field with more filters. I chose visits within a seeing range of between 0.5-0.8.

          I tried to follow the same procedure as in DM-9168 for creating the coadds, but the psf-matched coadds looked really bad. So these data are not psf-matched. This means each filter produces its own psf file.

          There are some very dense regions in this area. We again had problems when merging peaks, which isn't really relevant here. I chose some semi-random regions ranging from low to moderate density. We could find more examples of higher or lower density if desired.

          Here are thumbnails for images.

          All the output files can be found at http://tigress-web.princeton.edu/~rea3/m31_examples/examples.tar

          Show
          rearmstr Bob Armstrong added a comment - I have chosen data we already had of M31 on hand to use for this. We only had two broadbands (g and r) and one narrow band. I only processed the broadbands, so there is not much color information. We can revisit this again if this is important and select a different field with more filters. I chose visits within a seeing range of between 0.5-0.8. I tried to follow the same procedure as in DM-9168 for creating the coadds, but the psf-matched coadds looked really bad. So these data are not psf-matched. This means each filter produces its own psf file. There are some very dense regions in this area. We again had problems when merging peaks, which isn't really relevant here. I chose some semi-random regions ranging from low to moderate density. We could find more examples of higher or lower density if desired. Here are thumbnails for images. All the output files can be found at http://tigress-web.princeton.edu/~rea3/m31_examples/examples.tar
          Hide
          pmelchior Peter Melchior added a comment -

          Having only a few bands is fine, I don't expect color would help a lot in dense stellar fields. Since we have the PSF convolution built in the NMF model, it doesn't strictly require homogenized coadds, but our approximation of the convolution could create color-dependent problems if the OSF varies across bands. Still a good test case. The density looks OK, and thanks for the download URL.

          Show
          pmelchior Peter Melchior added a comment - Having only a few bands is fine, I don't expect color would help a lot in dense stellar fields. Since we have the PSF convolution built in the NMF model, it doesn't strictly require homogenized coadds, but our approximation of the convolution could create color-dependent problems if the OSF varies across bands. Still a good test case. The density looks OK, and thanks for the download URL.

            People

            • Assignee:
              rearmstr Bob Armstrong
              Reporter:
              swinbank John Swinbank
              Watchers:
              Bob Armstrong, John Swinbank, Peter Melchior
            • Votes:
              0 Vote for this issue
              Watchers:
              3 Start watching this issue

              Dates

              • Created:
                Updated:
                Resolved:

                Summary Panel